8/31/2021

Bay Area United Against War Newsletter, August 31, 2021

   




Vote 'NO' on the recall on Sept. 14! Stop the right-wing power grab!

 

We are hosting street meetings across the Bay Area. Join us:

 

East Bay - Monday 8/30, 12pm at Oscar Grant Plaza

 

San Jose - Friday 9/3, 5pm at the Tropicana shopping center

 

San Francisco - Saturday 9/4, 12pm at Dolores Park

 

The recall is, in reality, an attempted electoral coup

 

The PSL is not a supporter of Newsom nor the Democratic Party, but recognizes that the recall has been put on the ballot by a coalition of anti-immigrant, anti-worker, anti-environment and pro-death penalty forces backed by millions of dollars from the Trump-dominated national Republican Party and an array of corporate donors. They have spent many millions of dollars to impose an agenda that would harm the rights and interests of the working class, the vast majority of people, and the already devastated environment.


Read the full PSL statement on the recall election at:

https://www.liberationnews.org/psl-statement-on-california-recall-election/


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To: U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

End Legal Slavery in U.S. Prisons

Sign Petition at:

https://diy.rootsaction.org/petitions/end-legal-slavery-in-u-s-prisons

JM

 


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https://thetricontinental.org/let-cuba-live-exhibition/

Espaรฑol  Portuguรชs

On the anniversary of the 26th of July Movement’s founding, Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research launches the online exhibition, Let Cuba Live. 80 artists from 19 countries – including notable cartoonists and designers from Cuba – submitted over 100 works in defense of the Cuban Revolution. Together, the exhibition is a visual call for the end to the decades-long US-imposed blockade, whose effects have only deepened during the pandemic. The intentional blocking of remittances and Cuba’s use of global financial institutions have prevented essential food and medicine from entering the country. Together, the images in this exhibition demand: #UnblockCuba #LetCubaLive

Please contact art@thetricontinental.org if you are interested in organising a local exhibition of the exhibition.

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PLEASE WATCH….THEN THINK ABOUT COMING TO SHUT DOWN CREECH:

Sept. 26 -Oct. 2

We want to mobilize 500 people this fall,

And really SHUT IT DOWN!

Stop the Racist Drone Terror from the skies!

We can do it!

Co-sponsored by CODEPINK & Veterans For Peace

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Sincere Greetings of Peace:

 

The “In the Spirit of Mandela Coalition*” invites your participation and endorsement of the planned October 2021 International Tribunal. The Tribunal will be charging the United States government, its states, and specific agencies with human and civil rights violations against Black, Brown, and Indigenous people.

 

The Tribunal will be charging human and civil rights violations for:

• Racist police killings of Black, Brown, and Indigenous people,

• Hyper incarcerations of Black, Brown, and Indigenous people

• Political incarceration of Civil Rights/National Liberation era revolutionaries and activists, as well as present day activists,

• Environmental racism and its impact on Black, Brown, and Indigenous people,

• Public Health racism and disparities and its impact on Black, Brown, and Indigenous people, and

• Genocide of Black, Brown, and Indigenous people as a result of the historic and systemic charges of all the above.

 

The legal aspects of the Tribunal will be led by Attorney Nkechi Taifa along with a powerful team of seasoned attorneys from all the above fields. Thirteen jurists, some with international stature, will preside over the 3 days of testimonies. Testimonies will be elicited form impacted victims, expert witnesses, and attorneys with firsthand knowledge of specific incidences raised in the charges/indictment.

 

The 2021 International Tribunal has a unique set of outcomes and an opportunity to organize on a mass level across many social justice arenas. Upon the verdict, the results of the Tribunal will:

• Codify and publish the content and results of the Tribunal to be offered in High Schools and University curriculums,

• Provide organized, accurate information for reparation initiatives and community and human rights work,

• Strengthen the demand to free all Political Prisoners and establish a Truth and Reconciliation Commission mechanism to lead to their freedom,

• Provide the foundation for civil action in federal and state courts across the United States,

• Present a stronger case, building upon previous and respected human rights initiatives, on the international stage,

• Establish a healthy and viable massive national network of community organizations, activists, clergy, academics, and lawyers concerned with challenging human rights abuses on all levels and enhancing the quality of life for all people, and

• Establish the foundation to build a “Peoples’ Senate” representative of all 50 states, Indigenous Tribes, and major religions.

 

Endorsements are $25. Your endorsement will add to the volume of support and input vital to ensuring the success of these outcomes moving forward, and to the Tribunal itself. It will be transparently used to immediately move forward with the Tribunal outcomes.

 

We encourage you to add your name and organization to attend the monthly Tribunal updates and to sign on to one of the Tribunal Committees. (3rd Saturday of each month from 12 noon to 2 PM eastern time). Submit your name by emailing: spiritofmandela1@gmail.com

 

Please endorse now: http://spiritofmandela.org/endorse/

 

 

In solidarity,

 

Dr. A’isha Mohammad

 

Sekou Odinga

 

Matt Meyer

 

Jihad Abdulmumit

 

– Coordinating Committee

 

Created in 2018, In the Spirit of Mandela Coalition is a growing grouping of organizers, academics, clergy, attorneys, and organizations committed to working together against the systemic, historic, and ongoing human rights violations and abuses committed by the USA against Black, Brown, and Indigenous People. The Coalition recognizes and affirms the rich history of diverse and militant freedom fighters Nelson Mandela, Winnie Mandela, Graca Machel Mandela, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ella Baker, and many more. It is in their Spirit and affirming their legacy that we work.

 

https://spiritofmandela.org/campaigns/


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A NEW BOOK BY 


A BRILLIANT, BRAVE, BLACK POLITICAL JOURNALIST




THE BLACK AGENDA
GLEN FORD

Glen Ford was the most brilliant, courageous and consistent writer and journalist in the Black radical and independent tradition, of his generation – from the Sixties until now.
Cornel West

Glen Ford was the consummate journalist, a man who demanded rigorous analysis of himself and others, and who lived by the dictum of afflicting the comfortable and comforting the afflicted.
—Margaret Kimberley – co-founder, Black Agenda Report

Anyone who followed or knew Glen Ford was mentored by him. He is one of the few among us who lived by Amilcar Cabral’s iconic words: ’Tell no lies, claim no easy victories!’
Danny Haiphong

Glen’s transition to an ancestor has left a huge hole in our movement, not to mention in the hearts of so many of us.
—Ajamu Baraka
 

PRE-ORDER YOUR COPY NOW
and get 15% off
 
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OR Books

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OR Books | 137 West 14th Street | New York, NY 10011




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PLEASE CALL AND EMAIL ON BEHALF OF KEVIN RASHID JOHNSON!

 

๐˜ผ๐™ก๐™ก ๐™‹2๐™‹ ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™จ๐™š๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™™๐™–๐™ฎ ๐™ค๐™› ๐˜ฝ๐™ก๐™–๐™˜๐™  ๐˜ผ๐™ช๐™œ๐™ช๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™Š๐™ช๐™ง ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ข๐™ง๐™–๐™™๐™š ๐™๐™–๐™จ๐™๐™ž๐™™ ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก ๐™ฃ๐™š๐™š๐™™๐™จ ๐™ค๐™ช๐™ง ๐™–๐™จ๐™จ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™˜๐™š.  ๐™„๐™ฉ ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ž๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™š๐™ง๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ซ๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™˜๐™–๐™ก๐™ก๐™จ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™š๐™ข๐™–๐™ž๐™ก๐™จ ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก ๐™—๐™š ๐™ข๐™–๐™™๐™š ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™—๐™š๐™๐™–๐™ก๐™› ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™จ ๐™ก๐™ž๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™™ ๐™—๐™š๐™ก๐™ค๐™ฌ๐™Ž๐™ค๐™ข๐™š๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™š๐™™ ๐™ข๐™š ๐™š๐™–๐™ง๐™ก๐™ž๐™š๐™ง ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ก๐™ก ๐™ข๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™๐™–๐™จ๐™๐™ž๐™™'๐™จ ๐™˜๐™š๐™ก๐™ก ๐™๐™–๐™จ ๐™—๐™š๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™จ๐™š๐™–๐™ง๐™˜๐™๐™š๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™˜๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™ข๐™ค๐™ง๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™–๐™จ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ฎ๐™—๐™š๐™ก๐™ž๐™š๐™ซ๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™๐™š ๐™ž๐™จ ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ข๐™ข๐™ช๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™˜๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™ค๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™จ๐™ž๐™™๐™š.  ๐™๐™๐™š ๐™ค๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ง ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ž๐™จ๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ ๐™๐™–๐™ซ๐™š ๐™—๐™š๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ช๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™š๐™™๐™ฃ๐™ค๐™ฉ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ก๐™  ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™๐™ž๐™ข ๐™ค๐™ง ๐™–๐™จ๐™จ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ฉ ๐™๐™ž๐™ข ๐™ž๐™ฃ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™ฎ ๐™ฌ๐™–๐™ฎ๐™๐™๐™š ๐™ฅ๐™ž๐™œ๐™จ ๐™–๐™ง๐™š ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™จ๐™ค๐™ฌ ๐™™๐™ž๐™ซ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™ฅ๐™š๐™ง ๐™ช๐™จ๐™ช๐™–๐™ก. - Shupavu Wa Kirima 

 

๐™’๐™š ๐™–๐™ง๐™š ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก ๐™™๐™š๐™ข๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™›๐™ค๐™ก๐™ก๐™ค๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ:  

 

1. ๐˜ผ๐™ฃ ๐™š๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™—๐™ค๐™œ๐™ช๐™จ 30 ๐™™๐™–๐™ฎ ๐™ง๐™š๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ž๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™›๐™ง๐™ค๐™ข ๐™ฅ๐™๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™š๐™ข๐™–๐™ž๐™ก.   

 

2. ๐˜ผ๐™ฃ ๐™š๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™—๐™ค๐™œ๐™ช๐™จ 30 ๐™™๐™–๐™ฎ ๐™ง๐™š๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ž๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™›๐™ง๐™ค๐™ข ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ข๐™ข๐™ž๐™จ๐™จ๐™–๐™ง๐™ฎ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™š๐™ซ๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™จ ๐™๐™–๐™จ๐™๐™ž๐™™ ๐™›๐™ง๐™ค๐™ข ๐™ค๐™ง๐™™๐™š๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฎ ๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™ž๐™˜๐™ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™ฌ๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™š.

 

3. ๐™๐™๐™š ๐™ž๐™ข๐™ข๐™š๐™™๐™ž๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™ง๐™š๐™ฉ๐™ช๐™ง๐™ฃ ๐™ค๐™› ๐˜ผ๐™‡๐™‡ ๐™ค๐™› ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ค๐™ฅ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ฎ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™˜๐™ก๐™ช๐™™๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š $400 ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™ฌ๐™–๐™จ ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™ช๐™จ๐™ฉ ๐™–๐™˜๐™˜๐™ค๐™ช๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ง๐™š ๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™’๐™‘๐˜พ๐™ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™ก๐™š๐™œ๐™–๐™ก ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ค๐™ฅ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ฎ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™ž๐™˜๐™ ๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก ๐™š๐™ฃ๐™–๐™—๐™ก๐™š ๐™๐™ž๐™ข ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ช๐™š ๐™ฌ๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™˜๐™–๐™จ๐™š ๐™–๐™œ๐™–๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™ฉ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™„๐™‰๐˜ฟ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™–๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ข๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฉ ๐™ค๐™› ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™„๐™› ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ฎ ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ก๐™ก ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™ฉ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™๐™ž๐™จ ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ค๐™ฅ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ฎ ๐™๐™–๐™จ ๐™–๐™ก๐™ง๐™š๐™–๐™™๐™ฎ ๐™—๐™š๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™จ๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฉ ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™ฌ๐™š ๐™ฃ๐™š๐™š๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ ๐™ฃ๐™ค๐™ฌ ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™™๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™ž๐™ฉ ๐™ฌ๐™–๐™จ ๐™จ๐™๐™ž๐™ฅ๐™ฅ๐™š๐™™ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฌ๐™๐™–๐™ฉ ๐™›๐™–๐™˜๐™ž๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ฎ ๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™š๐™ž๐™ซ๐™š๐™™ ๐™ž๐™ฉ.

 

๐™๐™๐™–๐™ฃ๐™  ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช ๐™–๐™ก๐™ก ๐™จ๐™ค ๐™ข๐™ช๐™˜๐™ ๐™›๐™ค๐™ง ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช๐™ง ๐™จ๐™ค๐™ก๐™ž๐™™๐™–๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ฎ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™จ๐™ช๐™ฅ๐™ฅ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ฉ.  ๐™„ ๐™–๐™ฅ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ž๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™–๐™ก๐™ก ๐™ค๐™› ๐™ฎ๐™ค๐™ช๐™’๐™š ๐™–๐™ง๐™š ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™Š๐™‰๐™‡๐™”๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™š ๐™ค๐™› ๐™™๐™š๐™›๐™š๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™š ๐™›๐™ค๐™ง ๐™ค๐™ช๐™ง ๐™ž๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ž๐™จ๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™™ ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ข๐™ง๐™–๐™™๐™š๐™จ.   

 

๐˜ผ๐™ฃ๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ฉ๐™ฉ๐™š ๐˜พ๐™๐™–๐™ข๐™—๐™š๐™ง๐™จ-๐™Ž๐™ข๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™๐˜ฟ๐™ž๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ง ๐™ค๐™› ๐™Š๐™๐™ž๐™ค ๐˜ฟ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™–๐™ง๐™ฉ ๐™ค๐™› ๐™๐™š๐™๐™–๐™—๐™ž๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™จ ๐™ฅ๐™ก๐™š๐™–๐™จ๐™š๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ˆ๐™š๐™ก๐™ž๐™จ๐™จ๐™– ๐˜ผ๐™™๐™ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ (๐™€๐™ญ๐™š๐™˜๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ซ๐™š ๐˜ผ๐™จ๐™จ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™ซ๐™ž๐™– ๐™š๐™ข๐™–๐™ž๐™ก๐™ข๐™š๐™ก๐™ž๐™จ๐™จ๐™–.๐™–๐™™๐™ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™จ@๐™ค๐™™๐™ง๐™˜.๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š.๐™ค๐™.๐™ช๐™จ ๐™ค 614-752-1153.

 

๐™๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก๐™™ ๐™€๐™ง๐™™๐™ค๐™จ๐™Ž๐™ค๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™๐™š๐™ง๐™ฃ ๐™Š๐™๐™ž๐™ค ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก ๐™๐™–๐™˜๐™ž๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ฎ๐™’๐™–๐™ง๐™™๐™š๐™ฃ (๐™‡๐™ช๐™˜๐™–๐™จ๐™ซ๐™ž๐™ก๐™ก๐™š) (740)259-5544 ๐™™๐™ง๐™˜.๐™จ๐™ค๐™˜๐™›@๐™ค๐™™๐™ง๐™˜.๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š.๐™ค๐™๐™ž๐™ค.๐™ช๐™จ  

 

*๐™…๐™ค๐™จ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™ ๐™’๐™–๐™ก๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ๐˜ฟ๐™š๐™ฅ๐˜ฟ๐™ž๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ง ๐™‘๐™ž๐™ง๐™œ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™– ๐˜ฟ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™–๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ข๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฉ ๐™Š๐™› ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™Ÿ๐™ค๐™จ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™.๐™ฌ๐™–๐™ก๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ@๐™ซ๐™–๐™™๐™ค๐™˜.๐™ซ๐™ž๐™ง๐™œ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™–.๐™œ๐™ค๐™ซ (๐™‹๐™ง๐™ค๐™ญ๐™ฎ ๐™›๐™ค๐™ง ๐™ƒ๐™–๐™ง๐™ค๐™ก๐™™ ๐™’๐˜พ๐™ก๐™–๐™ง๐™ ๐™š๐˜ฟ๐™ž๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ง ๐™ค๐™› ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐˜ฟ๐™š๐™ฅ๐™–๐™ง๐™ฉ๐™ข๐™š๐™ฃ๐™ฉ ๐™ค๐™›๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™จ) (804)887-7982

 

*๐™…๐™–๐™ข๐™š๐™จ ๐™‹๐™–๐™ง๐™ ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ ๐˜ผ๐™™๐™ข๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™–๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ง ๐™…๐™–๐™ข๐™š๐™จ.๐™ฅ๐™–๐™ง๐™ @๐™ซ๐™–๐™™๐™ค๐™˜.๐™ซ๐™ž๐™ง๐™œ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ž๐™–.๐™œ๐™ค๐™ซ

 

๐˜พ๐™๐™–๐™ง๐™ก๐™š๐™ฃ๐™š ๐˜ฝ๐™ช๐™ง๐™ ๐™š๐™ฉ๐™ฉ๐˜ฟ๐™ž๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ค๐™ง ๐˜ฟ๐™Š๐˜พ ๐™Š๐™ข๐™—๐™ช๐™™๐™จ๐™ข๐™–๐™ฃ ๐˜ฝ๐™ช๐™ง๐™š๐™–๐™ช (๐™„๐™ฃ๐™™๐™ž๐™–๐™ฃ๐™–) (317) 234-3190 ๐™Š๐™ข๐™—๐™ช๐™™@๐™ž๐™™๐™ค๐™–.๐™ž๐™ฃ.๐™œ๐™ค๐™ซ  ๐™๐™ž๐™˜๐™๐™–๐™ง๐™™ ๐˜ฝ๐™ง๐™ค๐™ฌ๐™ฃ๐™’๐™–๐™ง๐™™๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™’๐™–๐™—๐™–๐™จ๐™ ๐™‘๐™–๐™ก๐™ก๐™š๐™ฎ ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก ๐™๐™–๐™˜๐™ž๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ฎ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™™๐™ž๐™–๐™ฃ๐™– (812) 398-5050

 

๐™๐™ž๐™˜๐™๐™–๐™ง๐™™ ๐˜ฝ๐™ง๐™ค๐™ฌ๐™ฃ๐™’๐™–๐™ง๐™™๐™š๐™ฃ ๐™’๐™–๐™—๐™–๐™จ๐™ ๐™‘๐™–๐™ก๐™ก๐™š๐™ฎ ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก ๐™๐™–๐™˜๐™ž๐™ก๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ฎ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™™๐™ž๐™–๐™ฃ๐™– (812) 398-5050  

 

*๐™˜๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ ๐™‘๐™ž๐™ง๐™œ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™– ๐˜ฟ๐™Š๐˜พ ๐™–๐™ช๐™ฉ๐™๐™ค๐™ง๐™ž๐™ฉ๐™ž๐™š๐™จ ๐™—๐™š๐™˜๐™–๐™ช๐™จ๐™š ๐™‘๐˜ผ ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ž๐™จ๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ ๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™–๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™›๐™š๐™ง๐™ง๐™š๐™™ ๐™ค๐™ฃ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง-๐™จ๐™ฉ๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š ๐™˜๐™ค๐™ข๐™ฅ๐™–๐™˜๐™ฉ๐™จ ๐™–๐™ง๐™š๐™จ๐™ช๐™ฅ๐™ฅ๐™ค๐™จ๐™š๐™™ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™๐™–๐™ซ๐™š ๐™–๐™ก๐™ก ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™ง๐™ž๐™œ๐™๐™ฉ๐™จ ๐™ค๐™› ๐™‘๐˜ผ ๐™ฅ๐™ง๐™ž๐™จ๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ง๐™จ๐™๐™–๐™จ๐™๐™ž๐™™ ๐™ฌ๐™–๐™จ ๐™ค๐™ง๐™ž๐™œ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™–๐™ก๐™ก๐™ฎ ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™˜๐™–๐™ง๐™˜๐™š๐™ง๐™–๐™ฉ๐™š๐™™ ๐™ž๐™ฃ ๐™‘๐˜ผ ๐™—๐™š๐™›๐™ค๐™ง๐™š๐™ฉ๐™ง๐™–๐™ฃ๐™จ๐™›๐™š๐™ง๐™จ ๐™ฉ๐™ค ๐™Š๐™ง๐™š๐™œ๐™ค๐™ฃ๐™๐™š๐™ญ๐™–๐™จ๐™๐™ก๐™ค๐™ง๐™ž๐™™๐™–๐™„๐™ฃ๐™™๐™ž๐™–๐™ฃ๐™–๐™–๐™ฃ๐™™ ๐™ฃ๐™ค๐™ฌ ๐™Š๐™๐™ž๐™ค.

 

Our mailing address is:

Kevin Rashid Johnson

D.O.C. #A787991

P.O. Box 45699

Lucasville, OH  45699


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Freedom for Major Tillery! End his Life Imprisonment!

Major Tillery and his family have set up a new Change.org petition to submit to the Board of Pardons in support his petition to commutation of his sentence to parole while maintaining his legal fight for exoneration and overturning of his conviction.
Major's commutation petition focuses on both his factual innocence as well as his decades of advocacy for other prisoners while serving almost 40 years as a lifer, over 20 of those years in solitary.

Please circulate and support the petition:



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Great news for Kevin Cooper, an innocent man 

on San Quentin's death row:
 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

 

Contact: Governor's Press Office

 

Friday, May 28, 2021

 

(916) 445-4571

 

Governor Newsom Announces Clemency Actions, Signs Executive Order for Independent Investigation of Kevin Cooper Case


SACRAMENTO – Governor Gavin Newsom today announced that he has granted 14 pardons, 13 commutations and 8 medical reprieves. In addition, the Governor signed an executive order to launch an independent investigation of death row inmate Kevin Cooper’s case as part of the evaluation of Cooper’s application for clemency.

The investigation will review trial and appellate records in the case, the facts underlying the conviction and all available evidence, including the results of the recently conducted DNA tests previously ordered by the Governor to examine additional evidence in the case using the latest, most scientifically reliable forensic testing.

The text of the Governor’s executive order can be found here:

https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/5.28.21-EO-N-06-21.pdf

The California Constitution gives the Governor the authority to grant executive clemency in the form of a pardon, commutation or reprieve. These clemency grants recognize the applicants’ subsequent efforts in self-development or the existence of a medical exigency. They do not forgive or minimize the harm caused.

The Governor regards clemency as an important part of the criminal justice system that can incentivize accountability and rehabilitation, increase public safety by removing counterproductive barriers to successful reentry, correct unjust results in the legal system and address the health needs of incarcerated people with high medical risks.

A pardon may remove counterproductive barriers to employment and public service, restore civic rights and responsibilities and prevent unjust collateral consequences of conviction, such as deportation and permanent family separation. A pardon does not expunge or erase a conviction.

 

A commutation modifies a sentence, making an incarcerated person eligible for an earlier release or allowing them to go before the Board of Parole Hearings for a hearing at which Parole Commissioners determine whether the individual is suitable for release.

A reprieve allows individuals classified by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as high medical risk to serve their sentences in appropriate alternative placements in the community consistent with public health and public safety.

The Governor weighs numerous factors in his review of clemency applications, including an applicant’s self-development and conduct since the offense, whether the grant is consistent with public safety and in the interest of justice, and the impact of a grant on the community, including crime victims and survivors.

While in office, Governor Newsom has granted a total of 86 pardons, 92 commutations and 28 reprieves.

The Governor’s Office encourages victims, survivors, and witnesses to register with CDCR’s Office of Victims and Survivors Rights and Services to receive information about an incarcerated person’s status. For general Information about victim services, to learn about victim-offender dialogues, or to register or update a registration confidentially, please visit:

 www.cdcr.ca.gov/Victim_Services/ or call 1-877-256-6877 (toll free).

Copies of the gubernatorial clemency certificates announced today can be found here:

https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/5.28.21-Clemency-certs.pdf

Additional information on executive clemency can be found here:

https://www.gov.ca.gov/clemency/

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"The State of Mumia" May 12, 2021

I don’t usually do this. This is discussing my self. I find it far more interesting to tell the stories of other, the revolving globe on which we dwell and the stories spawn by the fragile human condition and the struggles of humanity for liberation.

But I digress, uncomfortably.

This commentary is about the commentator.

Several weeks ago I underwent a medical procedure known as open heart surgery, a double bypass after it was learned that two vessels beating through my heart has significant blockages that impaired heart function.

This impairment was fixed by extremely well trained and young cardiologist who had extensive experience in this intricate surgical procedure.

I tell you I had no clue whatsoever that I suffered from such disease. Now to be perfectly honest, I feel fine.

Indeed, I feel more energetic than usual!

I thank you all, my family and friends, for your love and support.

Onwards to freedom with all my heart.

—Mumia Abu-Jamal



Demand Mumia's Freedom:

Governor Tom Wolf -1(717) 787-2500  Fax 1 (717) 772-8284
Office of the Governor
508 Main Capitol Building
HarrisburgPA  17120    
 
After calling the governor, send an online communication about our concerns.   https://www.governor.pa.gov/contact/#PhoneNumber
 
Let us know what there response was, Thank you.  Mobilization4Mumia@gmail.com
 
ONA MOVE
 

 

Questions and comments may be sent to: info@freedomarchives.org


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This beautiful and powerful exhibit is ongoing 

and can be viewed online at:



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A Plea for the Compassionate Release of 

Leonard Peltier

Video at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWdJdODKO6M&feature=youtu.be

Screen shot from video.

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https://www.nlg.org/federalrepressionresources/

Resources for Resisting Federal Repression

Since June of 2020, activists have been subjected to an increasingly aggressive crackdown on protests by federal law enforcement. The federal response to the movement for Black Lives has included federal criminal charges for activists, door knocks by federal law enforcement agents, and increased use of federal troops to violently police protests. 

The NLG National Office is releasing this resource page for activists who are resisting federal repression. It includes a link to our emergency hotline numbers, as well as our library of Know-Your-Rights materials, our recent federal repression webinar, and a list of some of our recommended resources for activists. We will continue to update this page. 

Please visit the NLG Mass Defense Program page for general protest-related legal support hotlines run by NLG chapters.

Emergency Hotlines

If you are contacted by federal law enforcement you should exercise all of your rights. It is always advisable to speak to an attorney before responding to federal authorities. 

State and Local Hotlines

If you have been contacted by the FBI or other federal law enforcement, in one of the following areas, you may be able to get help or information from one of these local NLG hotlines for: 

National Hotline

If you are located in an area with no hotline, you can call the following number:

Know Your Rights Materials

The NLG maintains a library of basic Know-Your-Rights guides. 

WEBINAR: Federal Repression of Activists & Their Lawyers: Legal & Ethical Strategies to Defend Our Movements: presented by NLG-NYC and NLG National Office

We also recommend the following resources: 

Center for Constitutional Rights

Civil Liberties Defense Center

Grand Jury Resistance Project

Katya Komisaruk

Movement for Black Lives Legal Resources

Tilted Scales Collective


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Articles

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1) The Fires in Greece Are a Terrifying Warning

By Alexander Clapp, August 27, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/27/opinion/greece-fires-climate-change.html

Yukai Du


ATHENS — Six years after finding themselves at the forefront of Europe’s political crisis over refugees, thousands of Greeks are now refugees in their own country.

 

On July 21, a small wildfire began burning over the northern half of Evia, an island around 30 miles northeast of Athens. Over the next 20 days — most of which exceeded 100 degrees Fahrenheit, or 38 degrees Celsius — it swelled into a vast conflagration, sweeping from one coastline of Evia to another and racking up a staggering balance sheet of damage: 120,000 acres of burned forest, hundreds of millions of euros in economic loss, and the wholesale evacuation of dozens of villages and thousands of islanders. Two people were killed.

 

The devastation, though shocking, isn’t new: Swaths of Greece burn virtually every summer. This year’s destruction pales in comparison to the summer of 2007, when fires across the Peloponnese and southern Evia burned 670,000 acres of forest and farmland. And for human life, worse still was the summer of 2018, when the seaside town of Mati was razed by one of this century’s deadliest fires, killing 102 residents.

 

What sets this summer’s fires apart, however, is the Greek state’s explanation of why they’re happening. “The climate crisis,” as Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said in early August, “is here.” But after decades of privatization, austerity and boundless military spending, the state is in no position to combat it. In places like Evia, Greeks have been largely left to fend for themselves.

 

It’s a cautionary tale: Across southern Europe and beyond, countries — Turkey, Italy and Algeria among them — have struggled to respond to wildfires, as decades of underinvestment have withered the state’s ability to protect its citizens. In Greece as elsewhere, to have any chance of mitigating climate catastrophe, the state must reverse much of what it has done for the last 30 years — and commit to the patient, long-term task of investing in environmental resilience. Otherwise Athens, streaked by smoke, could become Europe’s first uninhabitable capital city.

 

The roots of this summer’s fires in Greece go back to the postwar period, when breakneck urbanization — spurred by flimsy, often illegal building sprees — lured tens of thousands from the countryside to Athens. Entire coastlines were despoiled with concrete for the sake of touristic development, while colossal tracts of countryside, long overseen by shepherds and olive farmers with stakes in the well-being of the land, were emptied of many of their handlers. Even more devastating, on a global scale, was the environmental damage committed by Greece’s ship-owning magnates, whose ceaseless transport of hydrocarbons, combined with a stranglehold over the country’s political system, made them some of the world’s most stupendous agents of planetary desecration.

 

Even so, at least until the late 1980s, the state played a large role in securing public welfare. But over the next decade, that started to change. In search of immediate profits, the government sold off chunks of the country’s public sectors, among them telecommunications, electricity and gas. Responsibilities once held by the state fell to private interests, whose priority was to turn a profit off them, or to private citizens, who were left to pick up the pieces.

 

Take Greece’s firefighting sector. Though nominally under the state’s care, it suffered from under-resourcing: In the ’90s, the government annually deployed a small force of just 4,500 permanent firefighters — aided by thousands of seasonal hires — to stamp out summer blazes. Little attempt was made to harness resources for the long-term care of forestland that might prevent the onset of fires in the first place. Exacerbating the problem, in 1998 the liberal administration, as part of its bid to decentralize government further, uncoupled the task of firefighting from that of forest management altogether. Efforts to stymie fires became tangled in bureaucracy.

 

It got worse. The financial crash of 2008 and the ruthless austerity that followed — insisted on by the European Union countries now dispatching troops of firefighters to Athens — forced the Greek government to operate within strict budgetary requirements. With only minimal control over its own finances, it stripped back the firefighting budget by more than €100 million, or $118 million. The result was considerable abandonment. In recent weeks, as their homes burned in Evia, residents threw up their arms in despair. “The state is absent,” said one villager. “We were fighting alone,” said another.

 

There’s a twist. Though severely constrained, the Greek government does have access to substantial sums — but it chooses to use them for other purposes. Most strikingly, the government spends lavish amounts defending its citizens against the supposed threat of Turkey, which has itself suffered extensive wildfires this summer, with at least 160,000 acres of woodlands destroyed along the country’s tourist-saturated southern coastline.

 

It’s a strange situation: Last year, the two countries, both NATO members, spent over €20 billion arming themselves not against the demonstrable damage of climate change — but largely against one another. Were the Greek government to shift just a tenth of its annual military budget into environmental protection, it could afford to send around 45,000 additional firefighters into places like Evia every summer.

 

More bizarre still is what, in recent years, is accelerating the arms race. Discovered over the past 15 years, extensive natural gas deposits trapped beneath the eastern Mediterranean, large parts of which Turkey claims rest within its maritime borders, have given new fodder to the decades-old conflict. The irony is close to grotesque: Citizens of two states have been forced to become volunteer firefighters as their governments funnel billions of euros into bolstering claims to the very thing responsible for setting their countries ablaze.

 

It is, of course, hardly within Greece’s power to solve the climate crisis. But a state that radically reallocates existing resources and puts itself on a war footing against the climate threat, rather than against its own neighbors, could set an example for the rest of the Mediterranean, and beyond. The alternative — scorched land, rising seas, evacuated villages — is certain doom.


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2) Austin Police Officer Is Charged With Murder in a Second On-Duty Killing

Prosecutors said Friday that Christopher Taylor had been charged with fatally shooting Mauris DeSilva in July 2019, about nine months before he fatally shot another man.

By Michael Levenson, Aug. 27, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/27/us/christopher-taylor-police-officer-murder.html
Mauris DeSilva, center, with his parents, Joanie and Denzil DeSilva. An Austin, Texas, police officer is charged in the fatal shooting of Mauris DeSilva in 2019.
Mauris DeSilva, center, with his parents, Joanie and Denzil DeSilva. An Austin, Texas, police officer is charged in the fatal shooting of Mauris DeSilva in 2019. Credit...Family photo

A police officer in Austin, Texas, who was charged with murdering a man in April 2020 has been charged with murdering another man about nine months earlier, prosecutors said on Friday.

 

The latest indictments charge the officer, Christopher Taylor, 29, and another officer, Karl Krycia, 28, with murder and deadly conduct in the fatal shooting of Mauris DeSilva, 46, who had been holding a knife in the hallway of his condominium complex on July 31, 2019.

 

The charges came five months after Officer Taylor had been charged with fatally shooting Michael Ramos, 42, outside an Austin apartment complex on April 24, 2020.

 

The killing of Mr. Ramos, who was Black and Hispanic, set off protests against police violence in Austin about a month before the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis catalyzed global demonstrations against police brutality and systemic racism.

 

Mr. DeSilva had severe mental illness and had been holding a knife to his neck when people in the building called 911, according to a lawsuit filed by his father that accuses Officers Taylor and Krycia of knowing that Mr. DeSilva was experiencing a mental health crisis and yet still responding “as if this were the scene of a violent crime.”

 

Officer Taylor’s lawyers argued that he had been protecting himself after Mr. DeSilva refused to drop the knife and came within three or four feet of the officer.

 

“What happened was undoubtedly tragic, particularly if it is true the man was experiencing a psychiatric episode, but in no way was this murder,” the lawyers, Ken Ervin and Doug O’Connell, said in a statement.

 

They accused Josรฉ Garza, a former federal public defender who was elected Travis County district attorney in November 2020, of “waging a war on police officers.”

 

Mr. Garza’s office responded by noting that, since January, 12 officers whose potentially criminal conduct had been reviewed by a grand jury did not end up facing charges.

 

Jason English, a lawyer for Officer Krycia, said in a statement, “While we are sorry any time that a life is lost, we do believe that the actions were reasonable under the facts and justified under the law.”

 

Officer Krycia has been placed on paid administrative duty, Austin’s police chief, Joseph Chacon, said. Officer Taylor remains on leave without pay in connection with the killing of Mr. Ramos, he said.

 

“APD respects the role the grand jury holds in the criminal justice process and will continue to cooperate with the District Attorney’s Office on this case,” Chief Chacon said in a statement that noted that the officers were presumed innocent.

 

Lawyers for Mr. DeSilva’s father, Denzil DeSilva, said the charges would begin to help him heal.

 

“Due to the excessive force used by Austin Police Department officers, Denzil lost a beloved son, and the world lost a talented scientist and researcher,” the father’s lawyers said in a statement.

 

Mr. DeSilva grew up in Sri Lanka and had a doctorate in biomedical engineering, according to the father’s lawsuit. He also suffered from “increasingly severe mental illness” during the last years of his life, which the Austin police knew about, according to the lawsuit.

 

In February 2015, Mr. DeSilva grabbed a knife and threatened to hurt himself, and the Austin police responded, taking him to a hospital. In May 2019, he required “an emotionally disturbed person” intervention by the police, and on July 7, 2019, just weeks before he was fatally shot, he was committed to emergency detention, according to the lawsuit.

 

On the day Mr. DeSilva was killed, a neighbor called 911 to report that Mr. DeSilva was having “another mental episode” and asked that a mental health officer be dispatched, according to the lawsuit. Several others who saw Mr. DeSilva holding a knife to his neck also called 911.

 

Austin had a mental health officer on duty at the time, but Officers Taylor and Krycia and two other officers responded instead, the lawsuit states. They spoke to building workers, reviewed security footage and knew that Mr. DeSilva was experiencing a mental health crisis, the lawsuit states.

 

After taking an elevator to the fifth floor with a building worker, the officers found Mr. DeSilva in the hallway, with his back to them, looking in a mirror with a knife to his neck, according to the lawsuit.

 

Officers Taylor and Krycia shouted at Mr. DeSilva to drop the knife, and he lowered it. Officers then shouted, “Hey, man,” and Mr. DeSilva took one step in their direction, the lawsuit states.

 

Another officer fired a Taser at Mr. DeSilva, and Officers Taylor and Krycia simultaneously fired multiple shots at Mr. DeSilva, striking him in the chest, the lawsuit states. Mr. DeSilva was pronounced dead at a hospital.

 

About nine months later, on April 24, 2020, Officer Taylor went to the parking lot of an apartment complex after a 911 caller reported that Mr. Ramos was sitting in a car with drugs and holding a gun, with a woman next to him, the police said.

 

After meeting outside the apartment complex, he and a number of other officers confronted Mr. Ramos.

 

Dashboard camera video released by the police last year shows officers repeatedly ordering Mr. Ramos to put his hands up and step out of the car. Mr. Ramos can be seen getting out with his hands up. Officers then tell him to lift up his shirt and turn around in a circle, which he did.

 

Mr. Ramos waves his hands and yells at the officers, asking at one point, “What’s going on?” He also yells, “I ain’t got no gun, dog!” with an expletive added.

 

An officer fired a bean bag at Mr. Ramos, striking him in the thigh, the authorities said. Mr. Ramos then got back into the car and drove forward as officers yelled at him not to leave.

 

Officer Taylor fired three rounds from his rifle at Mr. Ramos’s moving car, striking him, the police said. Emergency medical workers took Mr. Ramos to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

 

The Austin police confirmed after the shooting that Mr. Ramos had not had a gun. Mr. Ervin said that Officer Taylor planned to plead not guilty in the fatal shooting of Mr. Ramos.


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3) When Police Lie, the Innocent Pay. Some Are Fighting Back.

Video from body cameras, doorbells and cellphones is revealing discrepancies between what police officers report and what actually happened.

By Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs and Frances Robles, Aug. 28, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/28/us/false-police-statements.html?action=click&module=Well&pgtype=Homepage&section=US%20News

Travis Price was charged with “hindering police” during the arrest of his brother. Body camera footage changed the narrative.

Travis Price was charged with “hindering police” during the arrest of his brother. Body camera footage changed the narrative. Cornell Watson for The New York Times


The statement from the Rock Hill Police Department was unequivocal about what Travis Price did: He belligerently obstructed officers as they arrested his brother on a gun charge; he shoved them and knocked them with his body; he refused to follow orders.

 

He was charged with “hindering police,” and the congressman in his district in South Carolina piled on with a statement of his own, describing Mr. Price as a “suspect” who “rolls up and starts interfering with things.”

 

Fifteen days later, after Mr. Price spent about 36 hours in jail, the truth came out. Body camera videos of the June 23 incident showed that Mr. Price had been calmly following the instructions of officers in the seconds before one officer, Jonathan Moreno, pushed him against a kerosene tank outside a gas station and took him to the ground.

 

“He had done nothing wrong,” Kevin Brackett, the region’s top prosecutor, acknowledged during a news conference last month. Mr. Brackett announced that he was charging Mr. Moreno, who was fired from the Police Department, with assault and battery. And in a dramatic moment, Mr. Brackett called Mr. Moreno to the podium, where he apologized.

 

“I did make a mistake,” he said. “I’m here to own it and I’m here to make it right.”

 

There have long been instances in which the police have provided false accounts of arrests, but disparities between officers’ descriptions and what people see have become more common with the expansion of body cameras and cellphone videos and as police departments’ public accounts draw more scrutiny.

 

The Minneapolis Police Department’s initial description of George Floyd’s death, in May 2020, said he had died after a “medical incident during police interaction.” That account was challenged within hours as a teenager’s gruesome video of his death flooded the internet, igniting the largest protests in a generation.

 

Across the United States, people who have been the targets of false police statements are increasingly working to correct the record, sometimes investigating their own cases, interviewing witnesses and filing defamation lawsuits.

 

“There’s a widespread search for tools to make the police more accountable,” said Lyrissa Lidsky, the dean of the University of Missouri School of Law and an expert in defamation law. “These lawsuits are part and parcel of the search for police accountability tools.”

 

But, Ms. Lidsky said, winning lawsuits is difficult in many cases.

 

“People shouldn’t think that it’s easy to bring a defamation suit against the police, because it’s hard — really hard,” she said. Suing a city, government agency, police officer or member of Congress often comes with additional challenges for plaintiffs, such as the qualified immunity doctrine that shields government officials in some situations.

 

In many cases, citizens who are mentioned in a police department’s false account have sued over other matters, such as civil rights violations or negligence.

 

Last year, the Detroit City Council approved a $75,000 payment to the owner of two dogs that were shot and killed by a police officer during a drug raid.

 

A police supervisor wrote in a report that the officer had seen one of two pit bulls “charging” and “attempting to bite” the officers. The supervisor also reported that he examined the body camera video and “found no discrepancies” with that account.

 

But when the graphic body camera video was released, it showed that the officer had shot the dogs one after the other without any provocation in a hallway of the home. A puppy could later be seen walking over one of the bloody bodies.

 

In some cases, people have read false accounts of their interactions with the police and tried to set the record straight.

 

In Central Florida, Chris Cordero was driving his tan Saturn through his neighborhood in Lake Wales early this year when, he said, he noticed a police cruiser following him. Mr. Cordero, 37, grew nervous, and then the officer pulled him over. What could have been a routine traffic stop ended with Mr. Cordero on the ground, in handcuffs. He would face several years in prison, accused of assaulting a police officer.

 

In his report, the officer, David Colt Black, said he had pulled Mr. Cordero over because he was not wearing a seatbelt and had ignored a stop sign. The officer said Mr. Cordero got out of his car and immediately charged at him.

 

“Cordero continued approaching me with closed fists, yelling, ‘You can’t stop me, you don’t have the right,’” the officer wrote, adding: “Cordero continued to charge towards me with closed fists.”

 

He said Mr. Cordero kept resisting arrest and seemed to be reaching for a weapon in his waistband, and so he used his elbow to deliver a swift strike to the side of Mr. Cordero’s head. Mr. Cordero was arrested and taken into custody.

 

But Mr. Cordero said he never charged the officer and was certain that the strike to his head was unprovoked. He decided to conduct his own investigation.

 

“I had to go door-to-door, because they were trying to give me from four to seven years in prison,” he said. “The officer said I charged his vehicle and I tried to attack him. I know I didn’t. I got out of the car and remained there.”

 

Mr. Cordero’s door-knocking produced quick results. He obtained a doorbell security video from the house across the street. The footage was from a bit of a distance, and it was hardly clear what was happening, but it was obvious that Mr. Cordero had not done what he had been accused of.

 

Video in hand, he started making phone calls, accusing the officers of brutality and of making racist slurs. Within a day, Officer Black submitted a supplemental report saying that he realized, after watching the surveillance footage, that his “perception was altered due to the high stress of the incident.”

 

“Based upon the video, I could see Cordero did not get as close to me as I originally thought he did,” Officer Black wrote, acknowledging that what happened did not justify a charge of assault on a law enforcement officer.

 

Officer Black later told investigators that he was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder from an incident several years ago when he had been beaten by a suspect and required hospitalization. After the revelations in Mr. Cordero’s case, Officer Black resigned from the department and began treatment, according to an investigative report by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. Investigators closed the case with no action, and the prosecutors did not charge the officer.

 

“He lied on a report,” Mr. Cordero said. “What did I do wrong? Nothing. I told the truth.”

 

Sara Jones, a lawyer who initially helped Mr. Cordero with the case, said she believed him from the start, because his account of being sucker-punched from behind during a traffic stop mirrored what she had heard from other clients.

 

“That is what made me believe he was telling the truth before I even saw the video,” Ms. Jones said.

 

The Lake Wales Police forwarded a reporter’s request for comment on the investigation to Officer Black’s father, a deputy chief at the department, who did not respond. Officer Black did not respond to a request for an interview.

 

In the case of Mr. Price in South Carolina, the Police Department never explained the false statement it gave reporters about what happened during the arrest. Mr. Price is suing the City of Rock Hill and Representative Ralph Norman, the Republican congressman, saying that both slandered him in their public statements.

 

A day after The New York Times contacted him, Mr. Norman’s office updated the statement on his blog and Facebook page to remove the false information.

 

Mr. Price, a father of two who works at a chemical plant, said he worried about what would have happened if there had not been a public outcry that led to the release of the body camera footage. Whose story would people have believed?

 

“How they degraded my name, it just ain’t right,” he said. “I just don’t want, everywhere I go, people looking at me all different, and it’s already that way. I want my character to still be the same.”

 

Mike Baker, Lucy Tompkins, Giulia McDonnell Nieto del Rio and Will Wright contributed reporting.



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4) A family says 10 of its members were killed in a U.S. drone strike in Kabul.

Afghanistan Live Updates, August 30, 2021

https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/08/30/world/afghanistan-news

Video player loading

Footage showed the site of a U.S. military drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan. The strike targeted a vehicle carrying explosives, a Defense Department official said.EPA, via Shutterstock


Hours after a U.S. military drone strike in Kabul on Sunday, Defense Department officials said that it had blown up a vehicle laden with explosives, eliminating a threat to Kabul’s airport from the Islamic State Khorasan group.

 

But at a family home in Kabul on Monday, survivors and neighbors said the strike had killed 10 people, including seven children, an aid worker for an American charity organization and a contractor with the U.S. military.

 

Zemari Ahmadi, who worked for the charity organization Nutrition and Education International, was on his way home from work after dropping off colleagues on Sunday evening, according to relatives and colleagues interviewed in Kabul.

 

As he pulled into the narrow street where he lived with his three brothers and their families, the children, seeing his white Toyota Corolla, ran outside to greet him. Some clambered aboard in the street, others gathered around as he pulled the car into the courtyard of their home.

 

It was then that they say the drone struck.

 

The missile hit the rear end of the Corolla in the narrow courtyard inside the walled family compound, blowing out doors, shattering windows and spraying shrapnel. Mr. Ahmadi and some of the children were killed inside his car; others were fatally wounded in adjacent rooms, family members said. An Afghan official confirmed that three of the dead children were transferred by ambulance from the home on Sunday.

 

Mr. Ahmadi’s daughter Samia, 21, was inside when she was struck by the blast wave. “At first I thought it was the Taliban,” she said. “But the Americans themselves did it.”

 

Samia said she staggered outside, choking, and saw the bodies of her siblings and relatives. “I saw the whole scene,” she said. “There were burnt pieces of flesh everywhere.”

 

Among the dead was her fiancรฉ, Ahmad Naser, 30, a former army officer and contractor with the U.S. military who had come from Herat, in western Afghanistan, in the hopes of being evacuated from Kabul.

 

A spokesman for the U.S. Central Command said on Sunday that the U.S. military had carried out a drone strike against an Islamic State Khorasan vehicle planning to attack Hamid Karzai International Airport. The group had claimed responsibility for the suicide bombing at the airport on Thursday.

 

On Monday, Capt. Bill Urban, the spokesman, reaffirmed an earlier statement that the military hit a valid target, an explosives-laden vehicle. He also repeated that the military was investigating claims of civilian casualties.

 

Mr. Ahmadi was a technical engineer for the local office of Nutrition and Education International, an American nonprofit based in Pasadena, Calif. His neighbors and relatives insisted that the engineer and his family members, many of whom had worked for the Afghan security forces, had no connection to any terrorist group.

 

They provided documents related to his long employment with the American charity, as well as Mr. Naser’s application for a Special Immigrant Visa, based on his service as a guard at Camp Lawton, in Herat.

 

“He was well respected by his colleagues and compassionate towards the poor and needy,” Steven Kwon, the president of NEI, said of Mr. Ahmadi in an email. He wrote that Mr. Ahmadi had just recently “prepared and delivered soy-based meals to hungry women and children at local refugee camps in Kabul.”

 

Najim Rahim, Helene Cooper and Eric Schmitt contributed reporting


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5) Demand for 'Moratorium on Drone Warfare' Follows Latest US Killing of Afghan Civilians

By Jake Johnson

—Common Dreams, August 30, 2021

https://www.commondreams.org/news/2021/08/30/demand-moratorium-drone-warfare-follows-latest-us-killing-

Relatives and neighbors of the Ahmadi family gathered around the incinerated husk of a vehicle hit by a U.S. drone strike in Kabul, Afghanistan on August 30, 2021.


The largest Muslim civil rights organization in the United States demanded Monday that the Biden administration immediately put in place a "moratorium on drone warfare" after the U.S. killed at least 10 Afghan civilians—including half a dozen children—with an airstrike in Kabul over the weekend.

 

"Enough is enough," Edward Ahmed Mitchell, national deputy director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), said in a statement. "For more than ten years, our government's drone strikes have killed thousands of innocent people in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, and elsewhere in the Muslim world—destroying family homes, wedding parties, and even funeral processions. The civilian casualties in Kabul are simply the latest victims of this misused technology."

 

Mitchell said the Biden administration should impose a temporary moratorium on the U.S. drone program—which is largely shrouded in secrecy—"until the government establishes strict oversight rules that would prevent these tragedies by severely limiting and transparently accounting for our military's use of drone warfare."

 

According to press reports and accounts from relatives and witnesses, the 10 people reportedly killed by the U.S. airstrike in Kabul on Sunday were all members of a single extended family—and at least three of the child victims were girls just two years old or younger.

 

"This is the latest in 20 years of innocent lives taken and children orphaned in Afghanistan and covert drone warfare around the world," Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) said Monday. "Impunity for these attacks continues to create a never-ending cycle of violence and retribution. Where should these victims go to seek justice?"

 

The Biden administration has yet to take responsibility for killing the civilians with its drone strike, which purportedly targeted an explosive-laden vehicle that the U.S. military claims ISIS-K was planning to use in another attack on Kabul's international airport.

 

"The U.S. went into Afghanistan seeking revenge and bombing civilians," Medea Benjamin, co-founder of the anti-war group CodePink, tweeted Monday. "Twenty years later, the U.S. is leaving Afghanistan seeking revenge and bombing civilians."

 

Maj. Gen. Hank Taylor, deputy director of the U.S. Joint Staff for Regional Operations, said during a press briefing on Monday that the Pentagon is "aware" of reports of civilian deaths in Kabul and that an investigation is underway.

 

In a statement, Amnesty International USA executive director Paul O'Brien said that the Biden administration "has a responsibility to the families of those killed to name the dead, acknowledge its actions, investigate, and provide reparations."

 

The Pentagon is notorious for dramatically undercounting the number of civilians killed in U.S. military operations overseas. And when the U.S. government does admit to killing civilians, it often refuses to provide any compensation to the victims' families.

 

"The United States has been killing civilians in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, and Somalia for years, under the guise of the so-called 'war on terror,' with impunity," said O'Brien. "For two decades, the United States has carried out strikes with no accountability to the public for how many civilians were killed."

 

The latest airstrike in Kabul, O'Brien argued, could be "a glimpse into the future U.S. involvement in Afghanistan if the Biden administration pushes ahead with an 'over the horizon' counter-terrorism program that does not prioritize civilian protection."

 

Earlier this year, the Biden administration quietly implemented temporary restrictions on drone strikes outside of "conventional battlefield zones" such as Afghanistan. But such limits did not stop U.S. military's Africa Command (AFRICOM) from launching a lethal drone strike in Somalia in July, the first attack on that country of Joe Biden's presidency.

 

As the withdrawal of U.S. troops continues apace ahead of the August 31 exit deadline, it appears that Biden is prepared to keep carrying out drone strikes in Afghanistan in the future. In a statement Friday after the U.S. launched a drone strike targeting two "planners and facilitators" of the deadly attack on Kabul's airport, Biden declared, "This strike was not the last."



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6) Hurricane Ida Offers a Glimpse of the Dystopia That’s Coming for All of Us

By Andy Horowitz, August 31, 2021

Dr. Horowitz, who lives in New Orleans, is the author of “Katrina: A History, 1915-2015.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/31/opinion/hurricane-ida-climate-change.html?action=click&module=Well&pgtype=Homepage&section=Guest%20Essays

The collapsed Karnofsky Shop building, a historic New Orleans jazz site, on Monday, after Hurricane Ida ripped through the area.

The collapsed Karnofsky Shop building, a historic New Orleans jazz site, on Monday, after Hurricane Ida ripped through the area. Credit...Mickey Welsh, via Reuters


As a boy, Louis Armstrong worked for the Karnofsky family. The Karnofskys’ tailor shop on South Rampart Street in New Orleans became a second home to him, and the family helped him buy his first cornet. On Sunday night, the Karnofsky building, long neglected by the city and a succession of private owners who promised to restore it, finally collapsed under the force of Hurricane Ida’s winds.

 

I live in New Orleans, but I saw the news on my phone, as I scrolled from the safety of a rented apartment in Birmingham, Ala. My family and I arrived on Friday. We are among the Louisianans who could afford to evacuate. We got here by driving I-59 to I-20, which is to say, we relied on the comparatively well-funded public infrastructure of interstate highways to get out of harm’s way.

 

Our less wealthy neighbors rely on streetcars and buses to get around, modes of public transportation that burn less gas and therefore contribute less to the rising seas and stronger storms that imperil us all. But there is limited regional bus or train service around New Orleans, and they largely were left to experience Hurricane Ida, one of the strongest to make landfall in Louisiana’s history, firsthand.

 

The reports I got from those who stayed, by necessity or obligation, were mixed. My wife’s cousin, a surgeon at Children’s Hospital New Orleans, said that for the first time in recent memory, the emergency room was quiet. A doctor friend in Thibodaux, 60 miles southwest of the city, texted to say that a floor of his hospital had lost power and staff were having to manually pump air into the lungs of intubated Covid patients as they moved them to a floor with a working generator. When he got a break, he texted again to say, “I mean this is traumatizing.”

 

The big story, for New Orleans, is that the levees held. This was a huge relief, a vindication of the work the Army corps did to build what it calls a “risk reduction system” for the city and its suburbs after Hurricane Katrina. Still, the system is less ambitious than the one Louisianans lobbied for after Katrina, and the protection it offers grows weaker every day, as the wetlands that buffer the city from the Gulf of Mexico get wetter.

 

It could not save the Karnofsky building from the wind, it did not prevent the failure of the New Orleans’s sewer system and it did not stop the region’s electrical transmission towers from toppling, leaving the hundreds of thousands of people who remain in the region without power for the foreseeable future. But it kept the Gulf of Mexico out of the city, which was its job.

 

The situation in Thibodaux, LaPlace and other towns east of the city is much worse. In this region along the Mississippi River — variously called the petrochemical corridor or Cancer Alley — people live with the constant threat of flooding, toxic emissions and other costs of our technological achievement.

 

LaPlace, where a storm surge in Lake Pontchartrain during Hurricane Isaac flooded 7,000 homes in 2012, has long lobbied for flood protection; Congress approved $760 million for a project in 2018. But it isn’t slated for completion until 2024, and the levees that residents knew would protect them weren’t anywhere near finished. As I write, there are people there standing in water up to their chests, waiting for rescue.

 

Houma, a city of more than 30,000 people near the coast, endured 150-mile-per-hour winds for hours. So too did many smaller communities, places like Isle de Jean Charles, Cocodrie, Chauvin and Golden Meadow, where Native people and other Louisianans make a life fishing and, often, working for the same oil and gas companies whose pipelines and emissions imperil their homes. Many houses along the coast are built on pilings, 10 feet or more in the air, because floods are so frequent. It is difficult to imagine what might be left.

 

Hurricane Ida’s lesson, therefore, is not that Louisiana’s storm protections are good enough. Its lesson is that investments in infrastructure save lives.

 

Nobody in Louisiana needed another hurricane to teach us this. Because of repeated hurricanes and coastal erosion, the population of Cameron Parish, on the state’s western border, is nearly half what it was in 2000; depending on how you look at it, this is either despite or because of an enormous new liquid natural gas facility in the parish.

 

Many residents of Lake Charles, just north of Cameron, remain in dire straits since last summer’s Hurricane Laura. Relatively little attention or recovery aid followed that Category 4 hurricane. The Trump administration bears much of the blame for not getting people the resources they need, but it did not help that it is growing ever harder for journalists and citizens to keep up with the floods, storms, wildfires and other dystopian manifestations of our changed climate. That’s why I worry the attention paid to Louisiana after Hurricane Ida will be short lived, too.

 

New Orleanians understood why the Biden White House gave Louisiana a D+ on the national “infrastructure report card” it released in April. With increasing regularity, for example, clouds have been dumping water into our bowl-shaped city faster than our drainage pumps can take it out. Earlier this summer, President Biden came to tour a linchpin of the city’s water system, called the Carrollton Water Plant, which supplies drinking water to much of New Orleans. “Infrastructure is all about making life livable for ordinary people,” he said outside the plant, stumping for the infrastructure bill that has since passed the Senate and awaits action in the House of Representatives.

 

A few days after the president’s visit, a problem in the electrical grid — unrelated to the gas shortage that was then vexing much of the South — caused a loss of power at the Carrollton Plant, prompting the New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board to issue a “precautionary boil water advisory” for a large section of the city.

 

This too is a familiar problem here. Mostly you hope you hear about the warning before you have made your coffee or brushed your teeth. If you don’t, you can console yourself knowing that the precautions usually turn out to be unnecessary — even if it is hard to shake the fact that not long ago, two people died nearby after drinking water that contained Naegleria fowleri, which is known as the brain-eating amoeba.

 

And even before Hurricane Ida blew through, the city’s hospitals were filled to capacity.

 

Yet through it all, New Orleanians continue to prove themselves capable of making beautiful moments. From an unfamiliar apartment in Birmingham, I think of Joe Krown playing a piano mounted in the back of a pickup truck or Kermit Ruffins advertising “shots for shots”: a free drink at his Mother-in-Law Lounge to people from the neighborhood who got their Covid vaccine.

 

I think, too, of the brass band staying limber by practicing on the front porch around the corner every week, with my neighbors dancing on the lawn, six feet apart. On a drizzling afternoon this winter, I walked over with my daughter, who was 4 then, just as the band was packing up. She cried because we had missed the music. The trumpeter saw her tears, called for all the instruments to come out of their cases, and the band played her request: “What a Wonderful World.”

 

The truth is that it’s hard to live in Louisiana. The truth is also that it’s hard to live in many places these days, and Louisiana has the benefit of being comparatively easy to love. In fact, it seems everybody loves New Orleans enough to want to come for a long weekend, because seemingly every block now has an Airbnb — or two or three — driving up housing costs, especially in neighborhoods on higher ground.

 

Evidently fewer people love New Orleans enough to insist, once they get back home, that their congressional representatives vote for the climate, infrastructure or social welfare legislation that might give this city a few extra decades, or expand the number of people who can make a viable life here, or anywhere else in the United States.

 

Instead, we’re told to be resilient, which usually means that we should attempt to find individual solutions to our structural problems.

 

Standing in front of the Carrollton Water Plant last May, Mr. Biden joked to reporters, “I’m taking up a collection.” If Louisiana’s vulnerability were unique, maybe charity would be enough.

 

But if you live near a coast yourself, I counsel solidarity today. Or, for that matter, if you drink water from the public supply, take medicine produced by federally funded research and development, entrust your children to a public school or your parents to a nursing home, or simply enjoy the occasional convenience of a bridge that does not fall, you might take an interest in that infrastructure bill.

 

At $1 trillion, it offers a modest down payment on our collective needs — shoring up the roads and bridges like those that my family and I will use to return home whenever the power comes back on and schools reopen. Take an interest though, too, in the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package Congress is also considering, which gets a little closer to the scale of the problems before us.

 

Structural problems need structural solutions. Don’t give charity to Louisiana because it’s unique. Demand that Congress take meaningful action, because Louisiana is not unique, and you may be next.


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